Jason Dana

Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Marketing

Jason Dana's research focuses on how people make decisions, particularly ethical decisions, in a wide variety of managerial and consumer contexts, such as how people deal with conflicts of interest, decide whether to give to charity or help others, and decide whether to be dishonest.

Education

  • PhD, Carnegie Mellon University

Courses

Negotiations
MGT 887
Leading Business & Society (BEMBE)
MGT 532

Publications

Selected Articles

Giving vs. Giving-in
D. M. Cain, J. D. Dana and G. E. Newman
Academy of Management Annals
2014
Transitivity of preferences
M. Regenwetter, J. Dana, and C. Davis-Stober
Psychological Review
2011
Justified ethicality: Observing desired counterfactuals modifies ethical perceptions and behavior
S. Shalvi, J. Dana, M. Handgraaf, and C. DeDreu
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
2011
Exploiting Moral Wriggle Room: Experiments demonstrating an illusory preference for fairness
J. Dana, R. Weber, and J. X. Kuang
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
2007
J. Dana, D. M. Cain and R. M. Dawes
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
2006