Yale School of Management

Content Tagged as Behavioral

The Irrational Consumer: Four Secrets to Engaging Shoppers

By: Ravi Dhar May 23, 2012
large amount of people in a shopping mall

Economists and marketers have long assumed that potential customers rationally weigh the costs and benefits of every possible choice before deciding what to buy. Under this assumption, marketers use tidy frameworks to help identify ways to influence consumer decisions. As it turns out, this...

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How Velvety is Your Wine?: How Asking the Right Question Can Help Shape Consumer Perceptions

January 1, 2011

It seems too good to be a true: a costless way to get consumers to like your product more, to pay more for it, and to consume more of it that involves no changes to the product itself. However, a new working paper from Jong Ming Kim and Professor Nathan Novemsky of the Yale School of Management...

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Up North and Down South: Spatial Metaphors Influence Consumers' Judgments

December 3, 2009

New Haven, Conn., December 3, 2009 — Maps depict northern locations to be above southern locations, and our speech commonly describes north to be above south (e.g., "up north" and "down south"). According to a study published in the December 2009 issue of the Journal of Marketing Research, the...

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Will You Still Love Your New iPhone Next Month? Study Shows Consumers Don’t Expect Product Enjoyment to Fade Over Time

September 9, 2008

New Haven, Conn., September 9, 2008 - Whether deciding to buy a new iPhone or a new car, consumers often do not consider that the initial thrill of a new purchase will wear off over time, according to new research from the Yale Center for Customer Insights at the Yale School of...

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