Yale School of Management

The Year in Pictures

A look back at some of our favorite Yale SOM moments of 2019, as viewed through Instagram.

December 30, 2019

This week, students are traveling for the Thanksgiving break. But before they left, they told us what they’re thankful for this year: som.yale.edu/thankful . “I’m grateful that Yale SOM is a place where people from so many diverse backgrounds (professional and otherwise) come together and really dig deep into what it means to have an impact on society." —Grace Liu Happ ’21 . “This Thanksgiving, I am thankful for the support and love of my Yale community. As we carry each other to the finish line, graduation, I am grateful for your wisdom and kindness. On a special note, I’m thankful for the opportunity to welcome into this world a future Yalie, Nico Hector Camacho, and share in these beautiful moments with my brilliant wife, Adriana.” —Jonathan Camacho ’20 . “This year has brought me more blessings than I am able to count. Joining the SOM community and finding myself in league with such an incredible group of people is consistently both humbling and deeply inspiring. I am thankful that I get to walk among visionary leaders in my field, and thankful that I am afforded such an opportunity to take that gift back to my part of the world and hopefully share its potential with my people. I am thankful that my boys will never have to wonder whether a place like Yale is within their reach in life. Most of all, though, I am so thankful for my wife, Brooklyn, who is truly the one making the sacrifice so that I am able to be a part of something so special.”—Justin Wilson ’21 . “Since I arrived at Yale, the staff has been incredibly helpful in integrating me in SOM and making sure I am getting the best out of this experience. Inside of the classroom, I have found incredible professors and teaching assistants who went above and beyond to make the most out of the diversity of backgrounds, nationalities, and experiences. In AASL, Global Programs, the Career Development Office—just to name a few—everyone has been always helping me with a smile, and doing the best they can for me to succeed. I am grateful to be part of such a welcoming community and to work with such extraordinary individuals.”—Sofia Ribeiro ’20

A post shared by Yale School of Management (@yalesom) on

“100% of the talent lies in 100% of the population,” said panelist Sandra Urie ‘85, one of the panelists at today's event The Pioneers: Celebrating Women Leaders of Yale SOM. Today's panel featured trailblazing SOM alumnae Linda Mason ’80, Chairman and co-Founder of Bright Horizons, Jane Mendillo ’84, former President and CEO, Harvard Management Company, and Sandra Urie ’85, Chairman Emeritus, Cambridge Associates. The event was introduced by Kavitha Bindra ’05, Assistant Dean for Executive Education, Sharon Oster, Frederic D. Wolfe Professor Emerita of Management and Entrepreneurship and moderated by Heather Tookes, Professor of Finance. #yalesom #yalewomen #yalesomalumni #yalealumni #50WomenAtYale150

A post shared by Yale School of Management (@yalesom) on

During #YaleSOM Club Kick-Off Week more than 100 students crowded into an Evans Hall classroom to learn more about the school’s fast-growing Women in Management Club (WIM). Club co-presidents Christine Liaw ’20 and Temi Ashiru ’20 don’t waste time getting down to business. “WIM is about your journey at SOM, every stage of it, from students to alumni,” Ashiru says. “We’re a social and professional support network for all SOM women—that’s the most important thing.” Yale SOM boasts dozens of student clubs, some devoted to professional interests, others to affinity groups or specials interests. The Women in Management Club cuts across categories, drawing a wide variety of students—of all gender identities—united by the common cause of creating equal career opportunities for all, organizers say. #yalesom #yale #womeninmanagement #diversity #inclusion

A post shared by Yale School of Management (@yalesom) on

Can annual, formal conversations and rote paperwork really be an accurate reflection of what an employee is contributing to an organization? To find out what’s working and not working about performance reviews, #YaleInsights asked Professor James Baron, an expert on human resources, about the research on the current system and what a better method might look like: "If an organization is wedded to an annual review, I would recommend shifting one’s frame of reference away from 'performance management' and toward what I call 'aspiration management.' The performance conversation should entail a deep discussion of what individual employees aspire to and how those aspirations can be married to organizational needs, perhaps in part through the process that my colleague Amy Wrzesniewski refers to as 'job crafting.' . #yalesom #yaleinsights #yalefaculty #facultyfriday

A post shared by Yale School of Management (@yalesom) on

Kelly Shue, professor of finance at SOM, and a coauthor have won the AQR Insight Award for their paper “ Can the Market Multiply and Divide? Non-Proportional Thinking in Financial Markets.” Shue’s research has explored executive social networks, compensation and promotions, sequential decision errors, mergers and acquisitions, corporate social responsibility, persuasion in corporate financial reporting, and errors in voting. The paper, cowritten with Richard R. Townsend of the University of California San Diego, argues that “non-proportional thinking can explain the ‘leverage effect’ puzzle, in which volatility is negatively related to past returns, as well as the volatility-size and beta-size relations in the data.” #yalesom #yalefaculty

A post shared by Yale School of Management (@yalesom) on

Emelyn Venturini Piñon '19 shares highlights from a West Coast job trek experience, one of the many career resources and opportunities offered at SOM. "I worked my way into a leadership position on the student-run Tech Club, and with this role came the opportunity to lead the annual Yale SOM West Coast Job Trek along with my awesome Tech Club team of first-year MBA students. My initial expectation of visiting companies was that I would come away with a better understanding of the firms we visited, the cultures, the roles within each one, and my potential fit. This expectation was surpassed when I encountered such great and attentive hosts at each company, who took a sincere interest in our cross-country trip and had impressive panelists and presentations ready for us. Scheduling 60-plus company visits and having the opportunity to see the cities, locations, and work environments of a potential job was very valuable, as we will probably spend more time at work than anywhere else post-MBA or MAM. Most visits featured Yale SOM hosts or panelists who truly cared about giving back to the community by scheduling additional chats and connecting us to other people within their teams who share similar career paths. We also had MAM alumni hosting us and representing the degree impressively, always willing to help a fellow MAM. I was able to form real job leads and visit startups and companies that completely surprised me and made me reconsider the characteristics I’m looking for in a company." #yale #yalesom #yalesomjobtreks

A post shared by Yale School of Management (@yalesom) on

Early January may be a quiet time on campus but it's still a busy time for students who choose to participate in job treks taking place in cities and company headquarters around the globe. . “Visiting companies on-site gives students the opportunity to gain insight into the culture and work-life of those organizations. We plan the treks so that students can see a diverse range of companies, including those that may not come to campus. For a lot of students, treks are a crucial part of the job search and assessing fit, as they look to see where they envision themselves at an internship or full-time job.” —Miranda Palter-Poston ’19 during the New York City job trek to @PayPal (pictured).

A post shared by Yale School of Management (@yalesom) on

News