MBA Blog

By: Ada Wan
September 21, 2012

Well, since this is my first blog post of many to come over the next couple of years, I thought I should come clean right away: I have a confession to make.Upon arriving in New Haven this past August, I had harbored all sorts of doubts and second thoughts about Yale SOM—the kind that, I’ll admit, led my friends to joke that my trip back to Boston for Labor Day weekend was actually a one-way trip.

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September 15, 2012

On Thursday night, I enjoyed an extraordinarily international array of conversations without leaving New Haven. The main event was the Yale World Fellows Night, showcasing this year’s 16 World Fellows from Algeria, Argentina, Chile, France, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Mexico, Morocco, South Africa, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

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April 8, 2012

After a brief break during which I visited 3 more countries I am back with the long-awaited recap on our Vietnam experience. As I mentioned in my previous blog, Vietnam felt like a different world after Bangladesh. A country so close, with similar natural resources was decades ahead in terms of development. One reason may be that there are half as many people living on double the land mass as compared to Bangladesh, but as we soon came to learn - centralized ruling may also have something to do with it.

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March 28, 2012

I'm still recovering from our International Experience trip to China and Hong Kong. It was a truly intense cultural, educational, social, and emotional experience - one of those events that you ponder and process long after it is done and that continues developing how you think about things. I met new people and made new friends, explored parts of the world that were abstract and dreamlike in my mind, learned about organizations and people that were previously a mystery, and grappled with some difficult philosophical questions.

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March 28, 2012

After days of meetings with government officials, venture capitalists and entrepreneurs, we visited the famous Kremlin and Red Square on the last day of our trip in Moscow. It is necessary to understand the Russian history and the Tsar’s rein in order to get a better idea of the current Russian political and economic situations. The Kremlin is separated into two zones. The tourism zone includes museums, cathedrals and art galleries, while the government zone is the president office (of course, we don’t have access to this zone. It’s heavily armed!)

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March 27, 2012

In a comment on my previous post, am833 wrote

"Why do [Indian] conglomerates run universities? Why don’t you see this happening in the US and other more ‘developed’ markets?"

This question has been on my mind in the wake of Yale SOM’s Education Leadership Conference on March 23rd.

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March 27, 2012

My International Experience trip to Shanghai, Nanjing, and Beijing was extremely educational and informative. Hearing from Chinese citizens working in the financial sector and experiencing daily life in the country adds important perspectives to what I have read in the press. I’ve summarized some of my final impressions below:

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March 25, 2012

Our group met up with the women of SEWA. The women started the meeting in prayer. It was a prayer based on Gandhian Philosophy – all religions are inclusive here. Founded and led by women, SEWA is a trade union representing self-employed women in India who are earning a living in the unorganized sector, unable to obtain the stability and welfare benefits typical of the organized sector. To put SEWA’s scope in context - India’s unorganized female labor force comprise of more than 90% of the total female labor force in India.

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March 22, 2012

Wine is an integral part of Hungarian culture. Hungary has a long history of wine making, and wine is now a major export and revenue source of local residents. We may not speak Hungarian but we definitely recognize some Hungarian words because many words for wine derive from Hungarian. White wine accounts for over 60% of total wine production in Hungary. The most famous Hungarian wines are the dry Bull’s Blood and Aszu. On the first day in Hungary, we visited two wineries, Heimann and Takler, located in the southern Szekszard region, which is about 250 kilometers from Budapest.

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March 21, 2012

At the Yale School of Management, we believe that our integrated curriculum provides the wide-angle lens needed to evaluate the "messy, real world problems" that leaders increasingly face. The international experience was a fascinating illustration of how these problems play out, and how our curriculum prepares us to address them. One of the things that caught my attention during our trip to India was the prevalence of large, diversified companies on our itinerary. These companies do everything.

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