Connection to Yale

Leaders for business and society are those who can see the implications of business decisions on the broader society around them and grasp how political and cultural trends are likely to affect their ventures. Among top business schools, Yale SOM is the most connected to our parent university. Our percentage of joint degree students is double or triple that of peer institutions. Our entrepreneurship electives draw students from Yale College; the Schools of Medicine, Forestry & Environmental Studies, Law, and Public Health; and throughout the university. Our faculty include Jackson Institute Fellows and scores of other Yale faculty with joint appointments.

Connect across Disciplines and Sectors

Students at the Yale School of Management benefit from everything Yale University has to offer.

  • Learn from the world's leading scientists and researchers by taking courses in engineering, medicine, or environmental sciences.
  • Work on an idea for a startup with a team made up of Yale College undergraduates, engineers, or Master of Environmental Management candidates.
  • Plan a major conference with other graduate and professional students.

All of these experiences will challenge you to expand your thinking, preparing you to lead in an increasingly complex world where knowing how to make connections among seemingly disparate sectors and individuals is key to success.

Two-Way Intellectual Exchange

At Yale SOM, students enjoy access to all of the other schools and programs at Yale. Students can take as many electives as they choose in other schools and departments at the university. And most do: upwards of 65% of full-time MBA students and 89% of Master of Advanced Management students take electives outside the School of Management.

Since Edward P. Evans Hall opened in January 2014, the school has become a university-wide hub for engagement, discussion, and activity.

More than 1,000 Yale students from outside SOM took SOM courses in 2015–16. In many cases, those students were sitting alongside MBA and MAM peers and working together with them on group assignments.

Having students with backgrounds in finance, architecture, development, and politics working on the same problem gives you the ability to break down issues and understand them in a way that’s only possible when you bring together people with different skills and expertise.Jon Cleary '16

 

Yale Resources Accelerate Entrepreneurship

There are no boundaries when it comes to entrepreneurship at Yale: Yale SOM's Program on Entrepreneurship draws students from across Yale, while university-wide events like #startupyale and programs like the Yale Entrepreneurial Institute bring together entrepreneurs from all disciplines and backgrounds. Many SOM entrepreneurs have collaborated with leading Yale researchers to bring bring innovative products to market.

Meet an SOM entrepreneur
 

The Joint Degree Path

More than 17% of the most recent MBA class is pursuing one of nine joint-degree programs. These dual-focused students bring wide-ranging professional interests and connections across campus with them to Evans Hall. The Yale Center for Business and the Environment is an invaluable resource for students pursuing a joint degree with the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, regularly bringing industry leaders and innovators to speak at Evans Hall.

Hear what joint-degree students have to say about how pursuing a joint degree accelerates their preparation for business and society:

The realization that as a single person, you can still make a change—that’s the real power of the MBA. Hilary Wang ’16
Joint Degree: Yale School of Medicine
Internship: Boston Consulting Group

In every class, we’re learning how to analyze problems from multiple stakeholder perspectives, and that’s critically important in my field.Logan Yonavjak ’16
MBA for Executives (Focus: Asset Management)
MF Candidate, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

I’ve gotten an excellent introduction to business, while also exploring energy sources that help mitigate the risks associated with oil and gas pipelines.Matt Hanna ’17
Joint Degree: School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Internship: Apex Clean Energy