Behavioral Science Conference 2014

International Center for Finance

April 25, 2014, 12:00 a.m. EDT

The 9th annual Behavioral Science Conference provides a venue for leading researchers from across the world to present and discuss their ideas. While there are other academic conferences that focus only on behavioral decision-making, or only on behavioral finance, or only on behavioral economics, the unique feature of this conference is that it brings together researchers from all three fields. This approach is already yielding results in terms of new inter-disciplinary research, and we expect it to continue to pay dividends in the future.

In order to ensure we have space for all participants, we ask that you preregister at this site. Registration Deadline Monday, April 21, 2014

For assistance, please contact Leigh Ann Clark at 203-432-6015 or leigh.clark@yale.edu

 

Edward P Evans Hall, Room 4430
165 Whitney Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
United States

Speakers

Pedro Bordalo

Senior Lecturer, University of London

Pedro is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Royal Holloway (University of London). His research interests are in Behavioral Economics and Applied Theory. His recent work focuses on the role of attention in decision making, and on its...

Pedro is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Royal Holloway (University of London). His research interests are in Behavioral Economics and Applied Theory. His recent work focuses on the role of attention in decision making, and on its implications in Finance and Industrial Organization.

Christopher Chabris

Associate Professor of Psychology and Co-Director of the Neuroscience Program, Union College

Christopher Chabris is a psychology professor and co-director of the neuroscience program at Union College, where he studies intelligence, thinking, and decision-making. He received his Ph.D. in psychology and A.B. in computer science from...

Christopher Chabris is a psychology professor and co-director of the neuroscience program at Union College, where he studies intelligence, thinking, and decision-making. He received his Ph.D. in psychology and A.B. in computer science from Harvard University. Chris is the co-author of the New York Times bestseller and Editor’s Choice book The Invisible Gorilla, and Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us, which has been published in 18 languages. He shared the 2004 Ig Nobel Prize in Psychology (awarded for “achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think”), given for the experiment that inspired the book. Chris has spoken to audiences at major conferences and businesses, including Google, PopTech, and Procter & Gamble, and his work has been published in leading journals including Science, Nature, Perception, and Cognitive Science. He is also a chess master, a poker amateur, and a contributor to the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and other national publications.

Shane Frederick

Professor of Marketing, Yale School of Management

Professor Frederick's research focuses on preference elicitation, framing effects, intertemporal choice, and decision-making under uncertainty. Before coming to Yale SOM he was associate professor of management science at Sloan School of...

Professor Frederick's research focuses on preference elicitation, framing effects, intertemporal choice, and decision-making under uncertainty. Before coming to Yale SOM he was associate professor of management science at Sloan School of Management at MIT. Prior to MIT, he was a research associate and lecturer at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University. Frederick holds a PhD in decision sciences from Carnegie Mellon University, an MA in resource management from Simon Fraser University, and a BS in zoology from the University of Wisconsin.

Sendhil Mullainathan

Professor of Economics, Harvard University

Sendhil Mullainathan is a Professor of Economics at Harvard University and a Cornell Tech Fellow. His real passion is behavioral economics. His work runs a wide gamut: the impact of poverty on mental bandwidth; whether CEO pay is excessive; using...

Sendhil Mullainathan is a Professor of Economics at Harvard University and a Cornell Tech Fellow. His real passion is behavioral economics. His work runs a wide gamut: the impact of poverty on mental bandwidth; whether CEO pay is excessive; using fictitious resumes to measure discrimination; showing that higher cigarette taxes makes smokers happier; modeling how competition affects media bias; and a model of coarse thinking. His latest research focuses on using machine learning and data mining techniques to better understand human behavior. He enjoys writing, having recently co-authored Scarcity: Why Having too Little Means so Much and writes regularly for the New York Times. He helped co-found a non-profit to apply behavioral science (ideas42), co-founded a center to promote the use of randomized control trials in development (the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab), serves on the board of the MacArthur Foundation, and has worked in government in various roles, including most recently as Assistant Director of Research at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. He is a recipient of the MacArthur “genius” Award, has been designated a “Young Global Leader” by the World Economic Forum, labeled a “Top 100 Thinker” by Foreign Policy Magazine, and named to the “Smart List: 50 people who will change the world” by Wired Magazine (UK). His hobbies include basketball, board games, googling and fixing-up classic espresso machines.

Christopher Parsons

Associate Professor of Finance, University of California, San Diego

Christopher Parsons is an Associate Professor at the Rady School of Management, at the University of California at San Diego. His research is focused on corporate finance, labor economics, real estate, urban economics and behavioral economics.

Sponsors

Conference Events

9:00 am Bus departs Omni Hotel for Conference
9:15 am Registration and breakfast
9:50 am Welcome and overview
10:00 am Christopher Chabris, Union College
Aristotle's Hypothesis About the Nature of Collective Intelligence
11:00 am Break
11:20 am Shane Frederick, Yale School of Management
The Consideration of Opportunity Costs by Buyers and Sellers
12:20 pm Lunch
Beinecke Room
1:50 pm Christopher Parsons, University of California, San Diego
Worrying about the Stock Market: Evidence from Hospital Admissions
2:50 pm Break
3:10 pm Sendhil Mullainathan, Harvard University
Machine Learning and Inductive Theory Testing: A Framework with Application to the Disposition Effect
4:10 pm Break
4:30 pm  Pedro Bordalo, Royal Holloway, University of London
Stereotypes
5:30 pm Conference adjourns
5:45 pm Bus departs Conference for the Omni
6:15 pm Cocktails, Union League Cafe
1032 Chapel St, New Haven, CT 06510
7:00 pm Dinner, Union League Cafe
1032 Chapel St, New Haven, CT 06510