2011 Behavioral Science Conference

2011 Behavioral Science Conference

International Center for Finance

Yale School of Management is a leading center for research in behavioral science – specifically, research in the fields of behavioral decision-making, behavioral economics, and behavioral finance. Behavioral decision-making studies the basic psychology of decision-making, while behavioral economics and behavioral finance study the role of irrational thinking in economic and financial decision-making, respectively.

The 7th annual Behavioral Science Conference provides a venue for leading researchers from across the world to present and discuss their ideas. While there are other academic conferences that focus only on behavioral decision-making, or only on behavioral finance, or only on behavioral economics, the unique feature of this conference is that it brings together researchers from all three fields. This approach is already yielding results in terms of new inter-disciplinary research, and we expect it to continue to pay dividends in the future.

Speakers

Nicholas C. Barberis
Stephen & Camille Schramm Professor of Finance Yale School of Management
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Professor Barberis’ research focuses on behavioral finance — in particular, on applications of cognitive psychology to understanding investor trading behavior and the pricing of financial assets. He has published extensively in the top economics and finance journals, gives frequent presentations about his work to both academic and non-academic audiences, and has won numerous awards for both research and teaching. Prior to coming to Yale, Professor Barberis taught at the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago.
Daniel Benjamin
Assistant Professor, Cornell University
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Dan Benjamin is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Cornell University. He is a behavioral economist doing both theoretical and experimental research. Recent work has identified how norms associated with Asian, black, and religious identities affect economic behaviors; examined genetic influences on economic decision-making; explored whether people make choices that they believe would maximize their happiness; shown that individuals with greater cognitive ability are more willing to delay gratification and take risks; and quantified the role of politicians’ charisma in winning elections. Dan received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 2006.
Lera Boroditsky
Assistant Professor, Stanford University
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Lera Boroditsky is an assistant professor of psychology at Stanford University and Editor in Chief of Frontiers in Cultural Psychology. Boroditsky’s research centers on how knowledge emerges out of the interactions of mind, world, and language, and the ways that languages and cultures shape human thinking. To this end, Boroditsky’s laboratory has collected data around the world, from Indonesia to Chile to Turkey to Aboriginal Australia. Her research has been widely featured in the media and has won multiple awards, including the CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, the Searle Scholars award, and the McDonnell Scholars award.
Ravi Dhar
George Rogers Clark Professor of Management and Marketing Director of the Center for Customer Insights Yale School of Management
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Professor Dhar also has an affiliated appointment as professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology, Yale University. He is an expert in consumer behavior and branding, marketing management, and marketing strategy. His research involves using psychological and economic principles to investigate fundamental aspects about the formation of consumer preferences in order to understand and predict consumer behavior in the marketplace. In one research program, he examines how an initial choice influences subsequent choices. He is also interested in the processes of self-regulation and, specifically, the simultaneous pursuit of multiple goals. In real-life situations, people hold several different, even conflicting goals that they intend to pursue (e.g., enjoy tasty food while also wanting a slim figure, pursuing career objectives while also wanting to spend time with family and friends.) His ongoing research explores the regulation of multiple goals in multiple goal systems. His work has been mentioned in Business Week, the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Economist, USA Today, and other popular media.